Top 10 Must Visit Attractions

Here are the top 10 must visit attractions here on the Suffolk Coast. There are so many to choose from so I have gone with some of our personal favourites!

Southwold Pier

The First of the Top 10 Must Visit attractions is Southwold

“Think of Southwold, and you’ll think of Southwold Pier. In fact, think of the British Seaside and you’re likely to think of Southwold Pier. For those of us who like our fun on the eccentric side, our food fresh and seasonal, and big, beautiful views, Southwold Pier is a simply marvellous way to spend the day.” 

RSPB Minsmere

RSPB Minsmere is a nature reserve owned and managed by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds at Minsmere, Suffolk. The 1,000-hectare site has been managed by the RSPB since 1947 and covers areas of reed bed, lowland heath, acid grassland, wet grassland, woodland and shingle vegetation. It lies within the Suffolk Coast and Heaths Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the Suffolk Heritage Coast area. It is conserved as a Site of Special Scientific Interest, Special Area of Conservation, Special Protection Area and Ramsar site.

RSPB Minsmere

Snape Maltings & Concert Hall

Snape Maltings is an arts complex on the banks of the River Alde at Snape, Suffolk, England. It is best known for its concert hall, which is one of the main sites of the annual Aldeburgh Festival. The original purpose of the Maltings was the malting of barley for the brewing of beer; local barley, once malted, was sent from here to London and exported to mainland Europe. Today a collection of shops, galleries, restaurants and the Concert Hall fill the old buildings. The Alde Estuary is known for wildlife and river trips.

An Ariel shot of Snape Village and Maltings

Sutton Hoo

Sutton Hoo near Woodbridge, in Suffolk, England, is the site of two early medieval cemeteries that date from the 6th to 7th centuries. Archaeologists have been excavating the area since 1939. One cemetery had an undisturbed ship burial with a wealth of Anglo-Saxon artefacts; most of these objects are now held by the British Museum. Scholars believe Rædwald of East Anglia to be the most likely the person buried in the ship.

The site is important in understanding the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of East Anglia and the early Anglo-Saxon period, as it illuminates a period that lacks historical documentation.

Sutton Hoo

Framlingham Castle

Surrounded by parkland and a picturesque lake, Framlingham Castle was once at the centre of a vast network of power and influence. Muster your courage, walk the spectacular wall walk and explore the towering walls behind which Mary Tudor was proclaimed Queen of England. From the remarkable 10.5 metres high curtain wall, take in breath-taking views of the Suffolk landscape and imagine life over 500 years ago.

Framlingham Castle

Aldeburgh

Aldeburgh is world-renowned thanks to its connection with Benjamin Britten, the founder of the Aldeburgh Festival, which takes place in June every year. Pastel-coloured 19th Century holiday villas line the promenade and to the east, the pebble beach with fisherman’s huts selling the daily catch.

Clothes boutiques, antiques and arts, an independent book shop and cinema plus a huge variety of culinary temptation, from the rightly-renowned fish and chips, to fine bistro dining, pizzas and, of course, seaside ice cream!

Aldeburgh

Leiston Abbey

Lying in peaceful open fields these striking ruins represent parts of the abbey church and the fairly extensive remains of the buildings around the cloister.

The site is entered through the 16th century gatehouse, with its octagonal brick turret, which incorporates the cellarer’s range – used for storage – on its northern side.

The cloister comes next, with traces of the canon’s wash-place or lavatory against the wall of the south range. At the east end of this southern range are the remains of the day stairs that led up to the refectory or frater. The modern steps in their place afford a good view across the unusually well-preserved remains of the refectory and its basement, or undercroft, which has an outstanding pointed window.

Leiston Abbey

Orford Castle

Orford Castle is a castle in Orford in the English county of Suffolk, 12 miles northeast of Ipswich, with views over Orford Ness. It was built between 1165 and 1173 by Henry II of England to consolidate royal power in the region. The well-preserved keep, described by historian R. Allen Brown as “one of the most remarkable keeps in England”, is of a unique design and probably based on Byzantine architecture. The keep stands within the earth-bank remains of the castle’s outer fortifications.

Orford Castle

Woodbridge

The ‘gem’ in Suffolk’s crown, Woodbridge combines excellent shops with superb pubs and restaurants and numerous activities both indoors and out. With lots to visit and do including the river walk and Tide Mill, a cruise along the Deben, some retail therapy in one of the many unique shops in the high street all followed by lunch or a coffee in one of the many artisan coffee shops. 

Woodbridge

There is so much to see and do...
2 days is just not enough!

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